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The world’s newest and brightest synchrotron light source—the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory—has produced one of the first publications resulting from work done during the facility's science commissioning phase.
Scientists at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and the School of Public Health of Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine at the University of Hong Kong have shown for the first time that it is possible to predict the timing and intensity of influenza outbreaks in subtropical climates.
QIAGEN announced results of operations for the second quarter of 2015 and first half of 2015, delivering on goals for higher adjusted net sales and earnings at constant exchange rates while moving ahead on initiatives to deliver a strong and sustained business expansion.
Scientists at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and the School of Public Health of Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine at the University of Hong Kong have shown for the first time that it is possible to predict the timing and intensity of influenza outbreaks in subtropical climates.
Columbia Engineering’s photonics experts, including Professors Keren Bergman, Michal Lipson, and Alex Gaeta, are an integral part of an exciting new Integrated Photonics Manufacturing Innovation Hub in Rochester, NY, announced by Vice President Joseph Biden at a press conference on July 27.
Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) have developed a computer algorithm that is helping scientists see how drugs produce pharmacological effects inside the body.
Can two entrepreneurs turn neuroscience into Moneyball?
Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) have found that key parts of the human brain network that give us the power to control and redirect our attention—a core cognitive ability—may be unique to humans.
Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic’s research is making it possible to engineer human bone and build parts of the heart and lung.
A key to better detecting the truth could reside in a person’s verbal cues, according to Julia Hirschberg, Percy K. and Vida L.W. Hudson Professor and Chair of Computer Science.