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Search Results > > Parkinson's Disease Diagnosis Through Transcriptome Wiring Analysis

Abstract

"Lead Inventors: Asa Abeliovich, M.D., Ph.D., Herve Rhinn

Parkinson's Disease (PD) Gene Analysis for Clarifying Genetic Differences Linked to PD Pathogenesis.
Although whole transcriptome gene analysis has identified specific RNA transcripts differentially expressed between brain tissue in patients afflicted with Parkinson's disease (PD) and healthy subjects, it is unclear to what extent these genetic differences are directly linked to the pathogenesis of PD. Moreover, differential expression analysis may not identify certain regulators integral to the disease that are not differentially expressed.

Transcriptome Analysis of Parkinson's Disease Identifies Biomarkers that could Aid PD Diagnosis
The technology is a transcriptome analysis of Parkinson's disease that employs a modified global differential wiring (GDW) analysis to suggest a pathogenic role for a unique transcript isoform of alpha-Synuclein (alpha-Syn) with an extended 3'UTR. The technology also employs a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify polymorphisms within the alpha-Syn and Parkin loci that are associated with alpha-Syn 3'UTR selection. These discoveries imply that genetic modification of the ratio of alpha-Syn mRNA with an extended 3'UTR to total alpha-Syn mRNA may play a significant role in PD pathogenesis.

Applications:
The technology identifies genetic polymorphisms and isoform expression levels that could aid PD diagnosis by serving as biomarkers for the disease.

Advantages:
The technology identifies a unifying mechanism for PD pathogenesis that could advance the development of new PD therapies.

Patent Status: Patent Pending

Licensing Status: Available for Sponsored Research Support

Publications: None
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Keywords

biomarker, neurodegenerative, parkinson's

Licensing Contact

The responsible technology licensing officer is Jerry Kokoshka, but for more information on this technology, please contact techtransfer@columbia.edu
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